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> Dvorak keymaps, get your keymaps here
panyo
post Oct 24 2004, 11:32 PM
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I am adding my dvorak keymaps for the Zaurus SL5500 to this thread. If
you are a dvorak user, I hope you will find them useful, and I hope you can help us
figure out how to extend the mapping to more contexts (console, Opie on OZ 3.5.1,
other Z hardware etc.). If you are not, I hope you will consider switching some time
when you can take a couple of weeks off from typing so you can train correctly.

For general information on the dvorak keyboard, have a look at this site:
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak/

In general for English typing, the dvorak keyboard is more efficient
leading to greater input speed and less stress on the fingers, hands,
and arms (carpal tunnel syndrome). Articles disputing this fact are
unfortunate instances of political arguments getting mixed with the
facts of a technical issue. Unfortunately, the dvorak keyboard was the
innocent victim of advocates who needed to win a rhetorical point in
defense of 'freedom' (understandably more important to them then the
fate of an obscure keyboard layout). To the extent that you have heard
somewhere, but you don't remember where, that the keyboard had been
'proved' not to be more efficient, they were rhetorically successful.
Even so, what they said was not true. Paul David had the last word on
that (economics- they never did argue ergonomics) debate and scored
the point for the dvorak (economics and ergonomics) side. The case as
it finally rested now appears in economics textbooks, including the
very mainstream Paul Samuelson principles text.

From my own experience, toward the end of my time as a qwerty user, I
was starting to get sore from my fingers to my forearms after a couple
of hours of typing. A few times, after a day of writing, I had to
spend about a week without typing for the pain to go away completely.
I have not had pain to speak of in the four years since switching to
dvorak. My typing speed is also better than that of friends who use
their keyboards in the same way, and better than it was before I
switched.


What about the Zaurus? Clearly the issues are different when thumb
typing. The reason I wanted to put dvorak on the Z is so that I would
not have to clutter my mind with a 'new' layout. But it turns out that
there are advantages to this layout for thumb typing. I have glued
rough pieces (split pineapple leaf) with Elmer's glue to the 'h' and
'u' keys, which are the home keys in dvorak. The main feature of the
keyboard is that your hands stay on the home row most of the time (can
clearly see this in the wear pattern on my laptop) and most of the
time keystrokes alternate between left and right. For thumb typing,
this means I am not jumping around the keyboard very much and am
therefore less likely to get lost if I type without looking. This
makes keyboard entry on the Z quite convenient.
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panyo
post Oct 24 2004, 11:36 PM
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The following file remaps the hardware keyboard of the SL5500 running an X
based GUI to this version of dvorak:

(wrapping around to the purple keys and displacing the question mark to the Q.)
CODE
?"'PYFGCRL
/,.pyfgcrl

AOEUIDHTN
aoeuidhtn

:QJKXBMS
;qjkxbms

ZVW
zvw


Open Zaurus 3.5.1 running GPE is missing the keys at the end of the
file. You may not need them in your version. These are the OZ/GPE
specific modifications:

The Fn-x, Fn-c, Fn-v, and Fn-<delete>
keys are replaced with [ ] ^ and ` respectively.
The four buttons on either side of the home button are <Ctrl>, <Alt_L>
and on the right { and }.
To use it you need to install the xmodmap ipk and process the file with it.
I have saved this file as .Xmodmap and have
xmodmap .Xmodmap
in my .profile file.

CODE
keysym  q = slash question
keysym  w = comma quotedbl
keysym  e = period apostrophe
keysym  r = p P
keysym  t = y Y
keysym  y = f F
keysym  u = g G
keysym  i = c C
keysym  o = r R
keysym  p = l L
keysym  s = o O
keysym  d = e E
keysym  f = u U
keysym  g = i I
keysym  h = d D
keysym  j = h H
keysym  k = t T
keysym  l = n N
keysym  comma = s
keysym  semicolon = S
keysym  z = semicolon colon
keysym  x = q Q
keysym  c = j J
keysym  v = k K
keysym  b = x X
keysym  n = b B
keysym  period = w
keysym  colon = W
keysym  apostrophe = v
keysym  quotedbl = V
keysym  slash = z
keysym  question = Z
keysym F5 = bracketleft
keysym F6 = bracketright
keysym F7 = asciicircum
keycode 89 = grave
keysym F2 = braceleft
keycode 98 = braceright
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panyo
post Oct 24 2004, 11:40 PM
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For a map in Opie on OZ 3.3.5, see my post near the end of this thread:
http://www.oesf.org/forums/inde...?showtopic=1474
They keymapping software mentioned there does not yet, to my knowledge,
work on OZ 3.5.1.
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zenyatta
post Oct 25 2004, 02:19 AM
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The Dvorak keyboard is a nice idea but I've read that it's really tough to re-orient from QWERTY and there is a period of several weeks to months when you are really unproductive because your fingers "stutter" as you adjust to the new layout. How was your learning process?

z.
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Hrw
post Oct 25 2004, 05:13 AM
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panyo: Your keymap is for keyz which work under OZ 3.5.1 (look at opie-zkbapplet). Send it to opie-devel@handhelds.org (or to any OPIE devel) so it will be added to distrubution.
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panyo
post Oct 25 2004, 08:49 AM
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QUOTE(zenyatta @ Oct 25 2004, 04:19 AM)
The Dvorak keyboard is a nice idea but I've read that it's really tough to re-orient from QWERTY and there is a period of several weeks to months when you are really unproductive because your fingers "stutter" as you adjust to the new layout. How was your learning process?

z.

Zenyatta,
Yes, that is true. That is why I say try this if you have a couple of weeks when you don't need to type.
It is the 'switching costs' that lead to lock-in, even if an alternate standard is superior. This is the part that is so interesting to economists.

I followed this tutorial, which is excellent and requires no software:
http://www.karelia.com/abcd/

My own experience is that I took one week training (half an hour at a time without 'overtraining', and no other typing) and then gave up and just started using it. I was commuting at the time and would practice the fingerings I had learned that day on the stearing wheel. For about another week my typing was labored but adequate. In about a month my typing was good but not as fast QWERTY. However, in QWERTY I typed with 10 fingers but I looked when I typed. In Dvorak, I typed correctly. For about a year I still made 'o' 'e' typos and had to look to get 'f'. I am sure this is because I did not properly finish the training.

Sometime in that period my speed recovered and then overtook QWERTY, but the thing I really noticed and that sold me on the new layout, was that I could type without pain. This was very marked. At the time, it was hard to switch old managed Windows machines to Dvorak (no problem on modern machines-- Regional and Language-->languages-->details--->click add dvorak). After just a few e-mails of QWERTY the discomfort and then pain would come back.

QUOTE(Hrw @ Oct 25 2004, 07:13 AM)
panyo: Your keymap is for keyz which work under OZ 3.5.1 (look at opie-zkbapplet). Send it to opie-devel@handhelds.org (or to any OPIE devel) so it will be added to distrubution.

Hrw, thank you very much for correcting my oversight. I will send that off.
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zenyatta
post Oct 25 2004, 01:15 PM
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QUOTE
Yes, that is true. That is why I say try this if you have a couple of weeks when you don't need to type.

Ha! That's a steep price indeed - but it's true I don't have the extra motivation of health problems. Thanks for writing up your experience, and I'm glad it helped you.
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systemparadox
post Oct 25 2004, 02:31 PM
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YES!!! Thankyou! I was wondering how useful a dvorak layout would be on a hardware keyboard, but from what you have said it should be much better.

For those who do not use dvorak, please, take some time to learn it. I am currently using someone else's pc with a qwerty board and my speed is still respectable, even when I type dvorak most of the time. I definately type faster on a dvorak board; this was the case even after a couple of weeks. Even though I use a dvorak layout most of the time, all the keyboards I ever use have the keys marked up in a qwerty layout. This helped me to learn to touch type wink.gif , well, sort of- I think I keep looking (I know its labelled as qwerty, but I just seem to know what that is in dvorak).

Has anyone tried typing "qwerty" on a qwerty keyboard? It's very annoying.

Go on, try it!
Simon
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ShiroiKuma
post Oct 25 2004, 03:07 PM
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I use Dvorak to type too.

One thing I never got though is the U vs I and D vs H keys. Apparently Dvorak designed the keyboard through frequency analysis of the English language, putting keys that you type the most often into home positions and the others further and further removed.

Well I think clearly D is more used than H, though there could be some discussion. However, I'm absolutely positive that I is typed much, much, much more often than a U.

So why are U and H in home, and for D and I you have to move your index fingers one bit?

Never saw this one answered anywhere.
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MrSquishy
post Oct 25 2004, 03:26 PM
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QUOTE
However, I'm absolutely positive that I is typed much, much, much more often than a U.

I = 5
U=5 +2 in my QUOTE tags. And one more for that.

U (9)clearly wins!
HUZZAH! (10)

-MrSqu(11)ishy
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vputz
post Oct 25 2004, 04:49 PM
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Here's another vote for Dvorak. While coding like a fiend in my MS program, I started to get some pretty severe RSI symptoms; a switch to Dvorak helped measurably (a later switch to a REAL ergonomic keyboard, the Kinesis classic, helped even more, but that's a different story).

Not sure I'd go for it on the Z, though--I can't look at a qwerty keyboard and tell what the dvorak mapping is without putting my hands on the home row. With the Z, I'd just flail at the keyboard with my thumbs anyway.

I'd use a Dvorak with an external keyboard, though, for sure.

-->VPutz
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