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drnick
Hello Z-users,
I am in the market for a new network attached strorage device. I need it to be able to read linux partitions though. I have a 200gig drive with 2 100gig partitions on it. I would like to share this drive on my network. Currently I use a spare box running linux and samba to share files to others connected behind my router. The problem is that the box is big (4U rackmount) and loud (usual 120mm fan found in big rack cases). I need something smaller and quieter. Most of the consumer NAS devices (netgear sc101, dlink, bytec, etc) can only read fat32 partitions. I stumbled upon the kurobox (www.revogear.com), which is a hackable Buffalo LinkStation made by a sister company of Buffalo Japan. It runs linux on a 2.4.17 kernel and has a small community run forum. It appears to do everything I want including act as a print server. But the community looks stagnant and its being replaced with a new model that is out of my price range. So my question stands.

Is there a NAS device that is:
Smaller than a PC
Quieter than a PC
Can read linux partitions
Come as an Enclosure (I dont want one with a HD already in it unless its in my price range)
Under US$200
Acting as a print server is also a plus.

PS: I would consider other suggestioins too.
PPS: Yes Ive seen the linksys nsl2 but you can only use USB drives
microsoft/linux
The one I would suggest si the Linksys NSLU2, but you said you'd rather not. The linksys one has a hack somewhere that will allow you to install a full-fledged linux install to it, and thus, do print-serving, ftp, NAS, and anything else you'd wanna do w/ a linux box. It'll obviously be able to read linux formated partitions, and you could use samba to pass it around. Check it out http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/Main/HomePage
vputz
(chuckle)--though the original poster didn't want the NSLU2, I actually may go out and grab one (I have a rackmount drive enclosure with empty space) and there are plenty of IDE-to-USB converters out there... sounds like a fun project, actually!
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