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anonuk
Trolltech are releasing a Linux mobile phone that is open (for flashing also)

Trolltech Linux Mobile Phone

Seems like it will only be sold to licensees, although im not sure exactly what that means...
I am definitely interested in getting this, even if it is only sold as a dev kit...

Anyone know any more info? (Maybe lpotter??)
Da_Blitz
actually they mention that it is part of a dev kit and that educational instatutions can purchase it as well


a platform like this is what is really needed, somthing that people can play with without fear of stuffing the device up, will this means more native linux apps for linux bassed phones?

i dont think so, the telcos relise that they have the customer by the <censored> and are clamping down and not letting go, i expect this is due in part to investor expectations where any opertunity to make profit must be pounced on without reagard for the wide range of effects on the consumer and how they own/use the device

sorry bout that, i ment to say "it looks nice" wink.gif
nilch
Ths is a great move by Trolltech - to release an open phone so more developers and carriers (doubt that) can develop around Qtopia Phone edition. If it really catches on - it would be a great way to develope an ecosystem around their platform.

I guess they had plans to bring a Qtopia phone to (US) market for a long time, but am sure they got stonewalled with carriers wanting to clamp down every possible open feature, so they just went the way alone. (just my conjecture).

It sure looks nice - has a great feature set - wifi + GSM + 1.3 megapixel camera, and a greenphone tag (for those candy phone lovers too).

I wonder though if any carriers and OEM's will jointly work to develop a phone on such open platform like the Qtopia Phone. Seems not very likely - considering the carriers propensity to rip off customers as much as possible.
Cresho
ill buy it just to have it.
kopsis
I'm not so sure that this "If we build it, they will come" strategy is going to accomplish much. Commercial developers aren't going to waste time on a platform with a path to the consumer that is speculative at best.

Open source developers may love it, but the first thing they're going to do is replace Trolltech's Qtopia with something else (OPIE or GPE) or spend all their time hacking in the kernel, not the application space. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it just doesn't help Trolltech with their goal of getting consumer friendly apps developed for the phone.

In the US, consumers in general don't even want smartphones. Of the few that do, most want little more than seamless desktop (Windows Outlook) integration, a good set of built-in PIM apps, and possibly Blackberry style email connectivity. Even with Windows Mobile devices (which are, for the most part, not crippled by the carriers), the fraction of users that ever install an app that didn't come bundled with the phone is surprisingly small. Now stir into that mix the schizophrenic (and corrupt) wireless carriers and it's pretty clear that smartphones will never be more than a tiny niche on this side of the pond.

I wish Trolltech luck. I'd really like to see Linux phones succeed, but my expectations are pretty low.
kurochka
QUOTE(kopsis @ Aug 15 2006, 09:12 AM)
I'm not so sure that this "If we build it, they will come" strategy is going to accomplish much. Commercial developers aren't going to waste time on a platform with a path to the consumer that is speculative at best.

Open source developers may love it, but the first thing they're going to do is replace Trolltech's Qtopia with something else (OPIE or GPE) or spend all their time hacking in the kernel, not the application space. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it just doesn't help Trolltech with their goal of getting consumer friendly apps developed for the phone.

In the US, consumers in general don't even want smartphones. Of the few that do, most want little more than seamless desktop (Windows Outlook) integration, a good set of built-in PIM apps, and possibly Blackberry style email connectivity. Even with Windows Mobile devices (which are, for the most part, not crippled by the carriers), the fraction of users that ever install an app that didn't come bundled with the phone is surprisingly small. Now stir into that mix the schizophrenic (and corrupt) wireless carriers and it's pretty clear that smartphones will never be more than a tiny niche on this side of the pond.

I wish Trolltech luck. I'd really like to see Linux phones succeed, but my expectations are pretty low.
*


Very grim outlook. I hope it will be proven wrong.

Here is why I don't like smart phones, especially Windows Mobile ones. I use an Axim with WM as part of my car GPS setup. It is so unreliable that I need to calm myself down by saying, this is Windows, remember. I shouldn't expect more from Windows. I do not want the same instability on my phone. I want phone to always work. Additional wistles are fine when they do not undermine that expectation.

I would buy a Linux smart phone if the stability is the same as that of my Zaurus. All linux converts would buy one too (I hope).


It appears the price will be $690. So, basically all Troltech licensees could buy kits including these phones. Do you think some of them will end up on ebay?
http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=3495
nilch
QUOTE(kopsis @ Aug 15 2006, 12:12 PM)
I'm not so sure that this "If we build it, they will come" strategy is going to accomplish much. Commercial developers aren't going to waste time on a platform with a path to the consumer that is speculative at best.

Open source developers may love it, but the first thing they're going to do is replace Trolltech's Qtopia with something else (OPIE or GPE) or spend all their time hacking in the kernel, not the application space. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it just doesn't help Trolltech with their goal of getting consumer friendly apps developed for the phone.
*


I can't help but agree ...
While it may be a good thing for developers and geeks , mainstream isnt going to be convinced unless apps are developed, not kernel hacks.
Da_Blitz
QUOTE
Open source developers may love it, but the first thing they're going to do is replace Trolltech's Qtopia with something else (OPIE or GPE) or spend all their time hacking in the kernel, not the application space. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it just doesn't help Trolltech with their goal of getting consumer friendly apps developed for the phone.


i second that

windows CE is a very stable OS
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
then you start installing apps and the stability goes to hell

it is unfortunate as i would have been in the "power user" catagorey (even had a ftp and http server on the thing to move files over wifi) the only real problem i had was the price off the good software and the fact that i used about 20 diffrent peices of saftware on a daily basis meaning it was quite expensive wink.gif the base rom dosent do enogh and means you have to invest huge amounts to get it to be a functional peice of equipment

now when using 20+ pieces of software you need to reset the device on a dialy basis minimum, that and backups dont always work and you use most of your ram due to some programs not liking bieng run off an SD card.

and in closing, i dont know of a consumer who wants "a seamless desktop" its just another marketing term, what consumers want is somthing that does everything for them and tells them those pants dont make them look fat, then there is the people who know computers,
lpotter
QUOTE(kopsis @ Aug 16 2006, 03:12 AM)
I'm not so sure that this "If we build it, they will come" strategy is going to accomplish much. Commercial developers aren't going to waste time on a platform with a path to the consumer that is speculative at best.

Actually, commercial developers as well as system integrators have shown interest in this.

It is also a 'proof of concept' reference board device.

QUOTE
Open source developers may love it, but the first thing they're going to do is replace Trolltech's Qtopia with something else (OPIE or GPE) or spend all their time hacking in the kernel, not the application space. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it just doesn't help Trolltech with their goal of getting consumer friendly apps developed for the phone.

If they do flash GPE or Opie, they wont be able to really access any GSM functions, thus turning there cool Greenphone into a Greenpda.


QUOTE
In the US, consumers in general don't even want smartphones. Of the few that do, most want little more than seamless desktop (Windows Outlook) integration, a good set of built-in PIM apps, and possibly Blackberry style email connectivity. Even with Windows Mobile devices (which are, for the most part, not crippled by the carriers), the fraction of users that ever install an app that didn't come bundled with the phone is surprisingly small. Now stir into that mix the schizophrenic (and corrupt) wireless carriers and it's pretty clear that smartphones will never be more than a tiny niche on this side of the pond.

I wish Trolltech luck. I'd really like to see Linux phones succeed, but my expectations are pretty low.
*


Greenphone is not a general consumer device. It is a developer SDK platform for Qtopia Phone.
lpotter
QUOTE(kurochka @ Aug 16 2006, 04:07 AM)
It appears the price will be $690.  So, basically all Troltech licensees could buy kits including these phones.  Do you think some of them will end up on ebay?
http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=3495
*


The price structure has not been set yet. It will be about mid-September when it is released.
lpotter
QUOTE(nilch @ Aug 16 2006, 05:58 AM)
I can't help but agree ...
While it may be a good thing for developers and geeks , mainstream isnt going to be convinced unless apps are developed, not kernel hacks.
*


Developers and geeks is exactly who this if for! Not Joe Grandma barely-can-make-mobile-phone-calls, or even general mobile phone consumer.
lpotter
QUOTE(nilch @ Aug 16 2006, 02:09 AM)
It sure looks nice - has a great feature set - wifi + GSM + 1.3 megapixel camera, and a greenphone tag (for those candy phone lovers too).

I wonder though if any carriers and OEM's will jointly work to develop a phone on such open platform like the Qtopia Phone. Seems not very likely - considering the carriers propensity to rip off customers as much as possible.
*


Greenphone does not have wifi. The Linuxdevices article is wrong.

This phone has nothing to do with carriers. This has everything to do with application developers, system integrators and such.
Mickeyl
QUOTE(lpotter)
If they do flash GPE or Opie, they wont be able to really access any GSM functions, thus turning there cool Greenphone into a Greenpda.

Why is that? How is the GSM part accessed?
mars
Slightly OT for Greenphone, but this is a qtopia phone with built-in keyboard and 640x240 resolution that just made the news and slashdot: http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/08/17/ro..._targets_nokia/

It is by German manufacturer Road and includes quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Apparently it has been vapourware until now (maybe still is).
bam
one question, I know this is a proof-of-concept item, but what carrier could I get this set up for, this is way too cool to let slip by.. smile.gif
lpotter
QUOTE(Mickeyl @ Aug 18 2006, 03:04 AM)
QUOTE(lpotter)
If they do flash GPE or Opie, they wont be able to really access any GSM functions, thus turning there cool Greenphone into a Greenpda.

Why is that? How is the GSM part accessed?
*



as far as I know, neither opie nor gpe has any gsm capabilities. Of course, that it not saying it is not possible.
lpotter
QUOTE(mars @ Aug 18 2006, 05:08 AM)
Slightly OT for Greenphone, but this is a qtopia phone with built-in keyboard and 640x240 resolution that just made the news and slashdot:  http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/08/17/ro..._targets_nokia/

It is by German manufacturer Road and includes quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Apparently it has been vapourware until now (maybe still is).
*


I wouldnt say its too off topic, as this device does ship with Qtopia on it.
nilch
QUOTE(lpotter @ Aug 17 2006, 09:35 AM)
QUOTE(nilch @ Aug 16 2006, 05:58 AM)

I can't help but agree ...
While it may be a good thing for developers and geeks , mainstream isnt going to be convinced unless apps are developed, not kernel hacks.
*


Developers and geeks is exactly who this if for! Not Joe Grandma barely-can-make-mobile-phone-calls, or even general mobile phone consumer.
*



Of course, understanding that is not for Joe six pack or Jane Grandma, what I want to stress on is the point that more apps on the Greenphone framework will make such an open based phone platform more attactrctive to "mainstream" phone manufacturers and ISP's et all, not consumers. Its adaptability factor will increase if mfrs can see that with an open platform they can have more apps on it, which will make it more attractive to consumers in turn.

Maybe, just maybe, that will also convince the carriers some what (though they are the the staunch opponents of freedom).

Its like all the apps for Palm made Palm PDA's such a in-demand product when palm started shelving out app development to the community (free and paid).
Windows CE intially didn't take off because of the lack of third-party apps.
The same maket paradigm can (and should) work for phones after all.
After all, phones are not only for making calls anymore and neither should it be only for apps (like Vcast GPS by verizon) sold and mandated only by the carriers. The general user should be able to buy a phone app from Handango (not counting the few Java game apps) and use it straightway on such a open phone.

So in the long run, such an open framework (or call it reference deisgn) like the greenphone is a very good step in making the market see the advantages of a open phone platform.
Mickeyl
QUOTE(lpotter @ Aug 17 2006, 06:14 PM)
QUOTE(Mickeyl @ Aug 18 2006, 03:04 AM)
QUOTE(lpotter)
If they do flash GPE or Opie, they wont be able to really access any GSM functions, thus turning there cool Greenphone into a Greenpda.

Why is that? How is the GSM part accessed?


as far as I know, neither opie nor gpe has any gsm capabilities. Of course, that it not saying it is not possible.


Aha, thanks. I was merely questioning the feasibility of accessing the GSM part with open source software at all, not the fact that currently(!) neither Opie nor GPE come with a telephony app.
Da_Blitz
GSM and modems are basically the same, normally the are connected to a serial part and use tha ATA command set with a few extra things for SMS and such so as long as you have pppd you can use gprs and if you have a modem dialing program and alsamixer you can make calls and route the audio
lpotter
QUOTE(Da_Blitz @ Aug 19 2006, 11:24 PM)
GSM and modems are basically the same, normally the are connected to a serial part and use tha ATA command set with a few extra things for SMS and such so as long as you have pppd you can use gprs and if you have a modem dialing program and alsamixer you can make calls and route the audio
*


True. but most mobile phone modems handle more than just communications. It' s the AT commands that aren't documented or in the GSM/GPRS spec that you would probably want most.
Ferret-Simpson
On the note of the Opie and GPE phone programs, don't forget that Gommunicator and it's sub-port Qommunicator (Designed FOR GPE and OPIE respectively) are currently in development.
richie
Hi all

Interesting article and photos here.

Cheers
Rich
Ferret-Simpson
If I can still afford it when it's released, I'll be getting one methinks.
speculatrix
you can now buy a greenphone with the development kit:
http://www.trolltech.com/company/newsroom/...9-11.5308424158
US$695 and up.

some pix at silicom.com
http://networks.silicon.com/mobile/0,39024...39162166,00.htm
dhns
QUOTE(speculatrix @ Sep 12 2006, 03:26 PM)
you can now buy a greenphone with the development kit:
http://www.trolltech.com/company/newsroom/...9-11.5308424158
US$695 and up.

some pix at silicom.com
http://networks.silicon.com/mobile/0,39024...39162166,00.htm
*

It is reported that it does not (yet) have WLAN. Is this true?

-- hns
zmiq2
lpotter,

is there any chance to get a group discount for oesf users? $695 it's a quite hefty price ...., twice a zaurus ....
nilch
QUOTE(dhns @ Sep 13 2006, 08:01 AM)
QUOTE(speculatrix @ Sep 12 2006, 03:26 PM)
you can now buy a greenphone with the development kit:
http://www.trolltech.com/company/newsroom/...9-11.5308424158
US$695 and up.

some pix at silicom.com
http://networks.silicon.com/mobile/0,39024...39162166,00.htm
*

It is reported that it does not (yet) have WLAN. Is this true?

-- hns
*



It is true. There is no Wifi on the Greenphone.
I think somewhere even Lpotter confirmed it.
miskinis
QUOTE
... There is no Wifi on the Greenphone ...


Of course not! Companies are hungry for money! One company that makes
devices, has to partner with another company for telephony "stuff". The end
result is, that they want you (to be forced) to connect to a phone carrier's
network (for $) when you want to connect to the internet!

The "Green Phone", get it! smile.gif
koen
'open'? Show me the sources!
dhns
QUOTE(miskinis @ Sep 13 2006, 07:41 PM)
QUOTE
... There is no Wifi on the Greenphone ...


Of course not! Companies are hungry for money! One company that makes
devices, has to partner with another company for telephony "stuff". The end
result is, that they want you (to be forced) to connect to a phone carrier's
network (for $) when you want to connect to the internet!

The "Green Phone", get it! smile.gif
*


I had thought the Greenphone should be a platform to push Linux phones and open software development. Not for making money by anyone.

And, there are some operators who operate both, a GPRS/UMTS and a WLAN Hotspot network. They don't really care too much.

What I suspect is that the hardware/software was not stable enough and they did not want to compromise the scheldule for launching the Greenphone.

But, together with the too high price and the licensing model they probably won't get too much new open software developers. They will get some companies who even pay an additional fee to develop closed software.

So, I think, most developers can live very well with a Zaurus + Bluetooth/WLAN card plus a bluetooth mobile phone from *insert your favourite brand*...

And to the title of this thread ("This might be what weve been waiting for") - not really...

-- hns
zmiq2
dhns, totally agree.

Once again we find an almost great linux platform, but dissapointing when looking at the details: no wifi, no umts and really expensive.
koen
QUOTE(zmiq2 @ Sep 13 2006, 08:00 PM)
dhns, totally agree.

Once again we find an almost great linux platform, but dissapointing when looking at the details: no wifi, no umts and really expensive.
*


Don't forget to mention the obsolete-before-launch 2.4 kernel from mvista it uses.
speculatrix
QUOTE(koen @ Sep 13 2006, 10:03 PM)
get to mention the obsolete-before-launch 2.4 kernel from mvista it uses.
*


yeah, dunno why they didn't want to run OZ with 2.6, thus they could have had a bleeding edge system without documentation and thus keep developers locked into their support contract!
tongue.gif
miskinis
QUOTE
[...] yeah, dunno why they didn't want to run OZ with 2.6, thus they could have had a bleeding edge system [...]


Hmm, without getting too far off track, I recently saw an announcement for OZ for
the 5500 with the 2.6 kernel, and after reading about it, and following some links,
I got the impression that SD cards and sound was not supported!

I'm being sincere, I'm not trying to be a smart allec, maybe I misinterpreted things...
koen
QUOTE(miskinis @ Sep 13 2006, 10:58 PM)
QUOTE
[...] yeah, dunno why they didn't want to run OZ with 2.6, thus they could have had a bleeding edge system [...]


Hmm, without getting too far off track, I recently saw an announcement for OZ for
the 5500 with the 2.6 kernel, and after reading about it, and following some links,
I got the impression that SD cards and sound was not supported!

I'm being sincere, I'm not trying to be a smart allec, maybe I misinterpreted things...
*



From the openzaurus.org frontpage:

QUOTE
Collie does not have working SD/MMC and we do not know when it will have it supported. Chip which control SD/MMC is not documented so to get it working under 2.6 someone would have to do some reverse-engineering work on 2.4 binary driver. Our kernel team work on getting other models fully supported.

It is experimental release to get wider testing of our work and to show all of you what we did during last months. Support for those machines needs some love and hard work, but machines are far more usable then they were under 2.4-crapix kernel.
swing
QUOTE(miskinis @ Sep 13 2006, 07:41 PM)
One company that makes
devices, has to partner with another company for telephony "stuff".  The end
result is, that they want you (to be forced) to connect to a phone carrier's
network (for $) when you want to connect to the internet!
It's changing though - look at Nokia who have now released phones with WiFi built in, and people like T-Mobile in the UK are promoting mobile phones with built in Skype apps on them!
speculatrix
QUOTE(swing @ Sep 14 2006, 01:46 PM)
It's changing though - look at Nokia who have now released phones with WiFi built in, and people like T-Mobile in the UK are promoting mobile phones with built in Skype apps on them!
*


I'm quite interested to see how the Nokia N80i will fare, their 6136 (I think) also does wifi/voip/sip. Apparently the SE P990 will do voip over wifi, but a quick google didn't reveal much technical detail.

British Telecom in the UK have a service called Fusion which uses a GSM mobile equipped with special firmware to use a bluetooth to PSTN gateway when at home; they're now also doing a wifi service but details are patchy: http://www.btbusinessshop.com/page/btfusion_hub

--edit: The Register got it wrong, BT business fusion is still bluetooth based--

So, convergence is definitely happening, and while the devices can contain lots of "bling" features, the actual voice-oip and video-oip still seems a bit clumsy.
swing
QUOTE(speculatrix @ Sep 14 2006, 02:23 PM)
British Telecom in the UK have a service called Fusion which uses a GSM mobile equipped with special firmware to use a bluetooth to PSTN gateway when at home; they're now also doing a wifi service but details are patchy: http://www.btbusinessshop.com/page/btfusion_hub
--edit: The Register got it wrong, BT business fusion is still bluetooth based--
Actually, I think the Register got it correct - BT have announced a Wifi version for corporates, as opposed to the Bluetooth version for consumers. However, given that BT can't yet confirm who is making the handsets, I think this is just an "announcement" and not a "shipping product" (it might not even be a designed product!).

So, we will see a Wifi version, just not yet smile.gif
desertrat
QUOTE(speculatrix @ Sep 14 2006, 01:23 PM)
I'm quite interested to see how the Nokia N80i will fare, their 6136 (I think) also does wifi/voip/sip. Apparently the SE P990 will do voip over wifi, but a quick google didn't reveal much technical detail.

The Nokia E70 does voip (sip) as well as have wifi.

QUOTE
So, convergence is definitely happening, and while the devices can contain lots of "bling" features, the actual voice-oip and video-oip still seems a bit clumsy.

It's actually quite easy to use once setup. On the E70 (I suspect the N80i will be the same) you can define one or more sip providers (gateways), you then register one of them (ie login/go online), from then on when you dial a number you can choose to make it an "internet call" ie voip. If you're on a wlan or have an unlimited data plan you can choose to leave the sip registered all day (or until your battery runs out smile.gif). And when you're registered you can receive calls via sip as well.

That's the theory. In practice these free sip providers seem to be rather flaky. Sometimes it takes ages for registration to succeed, sometimes it just plain fails. I've tried sipgate.co.uk, and sipphone.com so far. Yesterday sipgate.co.uk was ok, had no problems registering, but today it's hit and miss. sipphone.com which I've only started trying today is a bit hit and miss too. I can understand why there is so much momentum behind Skype because it "just works", which is a rather good thing.
speculatrix
QUOTE(desertrat @ Sep 15 2006, 05:25 PM)
The Nokia E70 does voip (sip) as well as have wifi.

That's the theory. In practice these free sip providers seem to be rather flaky. Sometimes it takes ages for registration to succeed, sometimes it just plain fails. I've tried sipgate.co.uk, and sipphone.com so far. Yesterday sipgate.co.uk was ok, had no problems registering, but today it's hit and miss. sipphone.com which I've only started trying today is a bit hit and miss too. I can understand why there is so much momentum behind Skype because it "just works", which is a rather good thing.
*


the e70... hmmm.
http://www.nokia.co.uk/nokia/0,6771,84103,...ter=benefits#17
yup. I wish Nokia used better product codes so you can guess what a phone might do.

a quick browse suggests that the SIP client in the E70 isn't very good ther very last comment on this forum:
http://www.trixbox.org/modules/newbb/viewt..._id=262&forum=1
indicates a lot of annoyances!
derekp
One thing to keep in mind with this greenphone product, is that it is not an end-consumer device. I've heard a lot of people complain about the high price, lack of this or lack of that (wifi, etc..). But keep in mind that this was a special limited run of units (I think they only ordered 1000 in the initial run). That automatically creates a higher per-unit cost. And, if you compare this against the normal cost of evaluation / development platforms, it really is about right in line. I've seen arm / xscale dev boards go for around $1500 or so.

Now, it would have been nice if Trolltech would have decided to make this a consumer device, with better power management (longer talk time / standby time), better radio, more expandability. But then they would be in compitition with their customers (the handset makers that they hope will start selling qtopia phone edition based phones). Also, the average person wouldn't buy it, because even with higher production runs it would still cost around $300 to $500 (that's about the going price for a Treo). The only way a consumer would get this is if it was offered subsidized by a carrier (i.e., so it appears as a "free" phone).

Personally, I think I'm going to go the do it yourself route. I'm not going to go as far as the Pocket Penguin group here is doing (buiding the circuit boards from scratch), howerver I was looking at getting a GumStix module, lcd, gsm module, and pack it all in either a regular phone housing (you can get the housings fairly cheap), or gut one of those $5 toy phones and use that for a housing. Total cost doing it this way would be around $450 or so, but it won't have that "finished" look and feel. Other option is to pick up a Motorola A780 and load up the userland replacement from open-ezx project. That may be the easier route, but then I'd be lacking a few hardware features.
lpotter
QUOTE(koen @ Sep 14 2006, 07:03 AM)
QUOTE(zmiq2 @ Sep 13 2006, 08:00 PM)
dhns, totally agree.

Once again we find an almost great linux platform, but dissapointing when looking at the details: no wifi, no umts and really expensive.
*


Don't forget to mention the obsolete-before-launch 2.4 kernel from mvista it uses.
*



You would have to talk to Yuhuatel about that. There are good reasons why they stuck with 2.4. Size for one thing.

How would you know if it is from montavista or not, I am quite sure you have yet to even see one.
*cough*
lpotter
QUOTE(derekp @ Sep 16 2006, 04:15 AM)
One thing to keep in mind with this greenphone product, is that it is not an end-consumer device.  I've heard a lot of people complain about the high price, lack of this or lack of that (wifi, etc..).  But keep in mind that this was a special limited run of units (I think they only ordered 1000 in the initial run).  That automatically creates a higher per-unit cost.  And, if you compare this against the normal cost of evaluation / development platforms, it really is about right in line.  I've seen arm / xscale dev boards go for around $1500 or so.

try more like $3000 + for some reference boards.
QUOTE
Now, it would have been nice if Trolltech would have decided to make this a consumer device, with better power management (longer talk time / standby time), better radio, more expandability.  But then they would be in compitition with their customers (the handset makers that they hope will start selling qtopia phone edition based phones).  Also, the average person wouldn't buy it, because even with higher production runs it would still cost around $300 to $500 (that's about the going price for a Treo).  The only way a consumer would get this is if it was offered subsidized by a carrier (i.e., so it appears as a "free" phone).

Trolltech is not in the hardware business. We sell software. The Greenphone is an SDK Development Kit. Nothing else.
miskinis
QUOTE
The Greenphone is an SDK Development Kit. Nothing else.


Gee, now I feel a little sorry for my somewhat-sarcastic post. In that case,
it's very cool. There is nothing in my mind that is better, than an actual
portable device to develop for/on. Emulators get boring and tiresome in the long haul. smile.gif
lpotter
QUOTE(koen @ Sep 14 2006, 05:06 AM)
'open'? Show me the sources!
*


The Greenphone hasn't even been delivered yet, and is the most open mobile phone out there.
koen
QUOTE(lpotter @ Sep 16 2006, 06:51 AM)
QUOTE(koen @ Sep 14 2006, 05:06 AM)
'open'? Show me the sources!
*


The Greenphone hasn't even been delivered yet, and is the most open mobile phone out there.
*


'hasn't even been delivered yet' + 'out there' = contradiction
Mickeyl
QUOTE(lpotter @ Sep 15 2006, 10:51 PM)
The Greenphone hasn't even been delivered yet, and is the most open mobile phone out there.


Excellent. I really welcome this step from Trolltech!

In the near future there will be more completely open source phones appearing (hint hint...) and the more the merrier it is for the open source movement.

If it wasn't for competing phone software stacks with fragmentation et. al., I'd welcome all this 100%...

*shrug* Let the most open system win... biggrin.gif
lpotter
QUOTE(koen @ Sep 16 2006, 07:53 PM)
QUOTE(lpotter @ Sep 16 2006, 06:51 AM)
QUOTE(koen @ Sep 14 2006, 05:06 AM)
'open'? Show me the sources!
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The Greenphone hasn't even been delivered yet, and is the most open mobile phone out there.
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'hasn't even been delivered yet' + 'out there' = contradiction
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Only for the pedantic. Greenphone was announced, and is being sold, so for all intents and purposes, it is 'out there'. I have one, it is no longer a secret, my wife and friends have seen it, so it is 'out there'.
lpotter
QUOTE(Mickeyl @ Sep 16 2006, 10:35 PM)
QUOTE(lpotter @ Sep 15 2006, 10:51 PM)
The Greenphone hasn't even been delivered yet, and is the most open mobile phone out there.


Excellent. I really welcome this step from Trolltech!

In the near future there will be more completely open source phones appearing (hint hint...) and the more the merrier it is for the open source movement.

If it wasn't for competing phone software stacks with fragmentation et. al., I'd welcome all this 100%...

*shrug* Let the most open system win... biggrin.gif
*



I am quite sure the carriers and operators are paranoid about "open" telephony stacks, not to mention the regulations involved... Most phones are subsidized by the operators/carrier, which is one reason why they can be so inexpensive.
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