Author Topic: Why Open Zaurus?  (Read 990 times)

dping28

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Why Open Zaurus?
« on: January 24, 2005, 08:48:41 am »
I was wondering if someone could tell me what is better with OZ then the stock image. Keep in mind I have only had my Z (6000L) for like a week and I am no linux guru but do enjoy going thru Linuxfromscratch or gentoo(good learning experiences). Could someone tell me benifits/differences over the stock? Thanks!
-D

Modifying and Tweaking is a journey,
not a destination...

V-Man

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Why Open Zaurus?
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2005, 10:49:26 pm »
As I see it, the benefits of the OZ rom over the Sharp rom is the flexibility to set it up any way you wish.  Also since development is still continuing on OZ, it is the only upgrade path open since Sharp abandoned us.  I would be using OZ except that it is missing one vital element that I require.  If that ever gets fixed (I am not a programmer or developer), I will switch to OZ in a heartbeat.  I am still praying that the developers can get linux running on my iPaq 2210.

I think that some others that use OZ on a daily basis and are more familiar with it can give you more details than I can.  I only check on it occasionally to see if the ability to switch WiFi network settings has been completed.  I have to connect to three different networks on a daily basis and can not give up this functionality so have unfortuneately been unable to switch to OZ.

V-Man
SL5500 w/Sharp ROM 3.10
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CaptainZilog

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Why Open Zaurus?
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2005, 11:54:31 pm »
Quote
I have to connect to three different networks on a daily basis and can not give up this functionality so have unfortuneately been unable to switch to OZ.

While it's not easy like clicking a button, here's what I did and it seems to work.

At home I have a WEP enabled AP, and when I go to my friend's houses, they all have open APs.

I made two files in the /etc/networks/ directory, interfaces.nowep and interfaces.wep

interfaces.wep contains the network settings I need to run at home. All that wlan-ng- stuff. It also links to a specific AP, because I shut off ESSID Broadcast on my AP. (Keep the honest people honest).

interfaces.nowep is a very basic config for the wlan-ng driver. Totally eliminated all lines about encryption and AP ESSIDs. It will connect to the first AP it sees.

I then (well, haven't done it yet, but will be simple to set up) run a script to swap either of those files as a symlink to /etc/networks/interfaces
That takes care of the first piece.

The second piece is to go to the /etc/wlan/ directory and check out the wlancfg-DEFAULT file. It is a config for any default ESSID you get (when you do not specify one in /etc/networks/interface). What I did, based on reading way too much info last night, is since my access point is named "AccessPointOne" I made a file called wlancfg-AccessPointOne, with the rest of the encryption setup.

It shouldn't be too hard to script the operation. I'm just really busy at work writing code for this dumb Pocket PC and *really* lazy when you get right down to it . If I have some free time this weekend I may write something up. The files are pretty self explanitory, except you might not know all the values for the wlan-ng- encryption configuration in /etc/networks/interfaces, but you can find it on this site. If you have any questions about that, let me know. I have tested this BTW, and it seems to work flawlessly, I haven't had any problems.

Oh and, hey guys, first post